Large Animal Sessions

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Honeybee Biology and Basic Beekeeping Practices

Elemir Simko

About the Speaker

Elemir Simko, DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Since 1998, Dr Elemir Simko, Anatomic Pathologist, has been a faculty member in the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the WCVM involved in teaching, diagnostics and research. His research interest is in pathogenesis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Recently, he established a Honey Bee Health research and teaching program at the WCVM.

DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Sep 8/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
South Room
A brief overview of honey bee biology and beekeeping practices in Western Canada will be presented with special emphases on those aspects that are related to honey bee health and diseases.

Most Important Honeybee Diseases in Saskatchewan

Elemir Simko

About the Speaker

Elemir Simko, DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Since 1998, Dr Elemir Simko, Anatomic Pathologist, has been a faculty member in the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the WCVM involved in teaching, diagnostics and research. His research interest is in pathogenesis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Recently, he established a Honey Bee Health research and teaching program at the WCVM.

DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Sep 8/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
South Room
Emphasis will be on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy and prevention of most common diseases (e.g. Varroosis, Nosemosis, American foulbrood, European foulbrood). The objective of both lectures is to provide basic information that is important to understand for all future "Bee Vets"

When Conversations Are Tough: Managing Challenging Conversations with Rural Clients

Erin Wasson

About the Speaker

Erin Wasson, MSW RSW

Erin Wasson is a registered social worker from the University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). She has spent her career working with individuals, couples, groups, and communities as a clinician and resource. Currently, her primary focus is on One Health approaches to social work practice.  These approaches are informed by the intersection of human beings, animals, and environment. Erin’s work also combines relational cultural theory and practice with interventions that explore holistic assessment and intervention. In 2014, Erin implemented Veterinary Social Work services at the WCVM, the first of its kind in Canada. In this role, she provides services to clients of the Veterinary Medical Centre; as well as resources to staff, faculty, and students. Erin has also been active in promoting resilience in the broader community. She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations and animal welfare organizations to facilitate workshops, in-services, and other education events.

MSW RSW

Sep 8/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
South Room
Veterinarians are trusted experts in food animal and equine medicine. Some of the more challenging calls come when the issues with a person’s herd are related to issues in a person’s home. As trusted members of agricultural communities, veterinarians are sought for psycho-social support which can often feel beyond their scope of practice. As a result, veterinarians should equip themselves with referral information for clients in cases where health is a factor. Learning how to approach clients about these issues, and familiarizing oneself support services, is key to resolving cases where client issues impact on herd health. As veterinary responsibilities grow, ability to redirect clients is also a step towards preventing or resolving identified human and animal welfare issues. Join Erin Wasson (BSW, MSW, RSW) in talking about how to get the conversation going. This talk is about when you feel like you're beyond your depth with the “touchy feely” stuff, someone’s herd is about to be or is a “wreck”, and you want to know how to pass them on to somebody else.

Tying Up Loose Ends in the Tied Up Horse

Julia Montgomery

About the Speaker

Julia Montgomery, Med Vet, PhD, DACVIM (LAIM)

Dr Montgomery holds a veterinary degree from the School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Germany, and a PhD from the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC), University of Prince Edward Island. After completing a large animal internal medicine residency at the same institution, Dr Montgomery was awarded diplomate status with the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (specialty of Large Animal Internal Medicine) in 2008. Dr Montgomery joined the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the WCVM as an Assistant Professor in 2013, after completing a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences. Dr Montgomery’s clinical and research interests are in the field of equine internal medicine and equine rehabilitation.

Med Vet, PhD, DACVIM (LAIM)

Sep 8/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
South Room
Dr Montgomery’s lecture will cover recommendations on diagnostic testing for horses with recurring Rhabdomyolysis and options for their long-term nutritional management.

Critical Appraisal of Evidence about Drugs

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
South Room
This presentation will be a review what types of evidence support drug decisions and how to critically appraise the evidence and apply it to clinical decision-making.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



Principles of Antimicrobial Stewardship

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
South Room
This presentation will focus on defining stewardship, outlining a framework for applying stewardship in practice, and reviewing some of the data on how to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



Drug Decision-Making Scenarios

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
South Room
This hour will highlight common uses of drugs, particularly antibiotic, and the evidence for or against their use. Possible scenarios will be perioperative use, respiratory disease, contagious abortion, and footrot in ruminants.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



When Things Go Wrong: Dealing with Surgical Complications in Alpacas

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
South Room
All veterinarians know that sometimes things go wrong despite our best efforts. Camelids are susceptible to the same complications as other animals. However, sometimes their unique anatomy and physiology can make even experienced veterinarians feel out of their comfort zone when dealing with complications. In this session, we will discuss some of the complications that we’ve experienced at one referral hospital, including incisional complications, orthopedic complications, and obstetrical complications.

Anesthesia and Surgery of Pet Pigs

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
South Room
Pet pigs are gaining popularity in the US and Canada. As such, surgical procedures and routine care that are commonly performed on other pets such as dogs are being frequently performed in pigs. Spays and castrations are among the most commonly performed procedures in pet pigs. Also anesthetic procedures are needed to enable veterinary surgeons to safely and humanely perform these surgeries. However, these animals are not merely a different breed of dog, and there are special anatomic and physiologic differences that can make these procedures challenging. We will discuss some of the important anesthetic and surgical considerations in these animals and will highlight some of the key differences between pigs and more common domestic animals. This session will definitely be of interest to companion animal practitioners as well.

Useful Nerve Blocks for Cattle

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
South Room
Many surgical procedures in cattle are performed without the benefit of general anesthesia. Routine surgeries such as DA correction, C-section, exploratory, dehorning, castrations, and invasive hoof procedures are commonly performed in conscious animals. Nerve blocks are very useful to provide local or regional anesthesia to facilitate surgical procedures or increase animal comfort. Nerve blocks can also be used in conjunction with general anesthesia or sedation to decrease the amount of anesthetic drug required. Although some procedures are quick enough to be performed without a local block, local or regional anesthesia should be considered whenever the pain of the surgical procedure or the post-operative pain of the procedure places unnecessary stress on the animal.

Pain Sensitivity and Healing of Hot Iron Brands in Cattle

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 pm
South Room
Hot-iron branding is widely used for herd identification. Other studies have documented that cattle vocalize, show signs of restlessness and escape attempts during the procedure itself. Little work had documented the pain associated with the brand wounds as they heal. New evidence suggests that these wounds remain painful throughout the healing process (8+ weeks). At least 2 possible practical solutions, a single injection of NSAID or a cooling gel applied at the time of branding, do not hasten healing or affect painfulness of the wounds. Alternatives are needed. These results will be discussed, along with some general consideration of other factors including age of the procedure, as well as the size, shape, and location of brand.

Animal Welfare Assessments for Cow/Calf Operations: Practical Learnings from 30 Ranches

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
South Room
Animal welfare assessments are being widely used in other sectors of animal agriculture. We recently developed an assessment for cow-calf operations and used it to examine the health and behavior of beef cows being worked in a chute on 30 California ranches. We found relatively little variation among health outcomes. Injury, lameness and low body condition were all rare. In contrast, we found that ranchers varied considerably in how they handled their animals. For example, some ranchers never used an electric prod, while others used it on 75% of their animals. Using this variation, we identified that cows touched with an electric prod were more likely to balk, vocalize, stumble and fall in the chute, and stumble and run as they exited. In addition to generating knowledge about how management practices affect cattle behavior, we also provided each participating ranch with a benchmarking report, showing them how they compared to the other 29 ranches in the study. These benchmarking results, along with other health and behavioral findings will be discussed.

Animal Welfare and Society: Market-Driven Change

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
South Room
The largest driver of changes in animal welfare in the US are corporate and industry-led assessment and audit programs. These programs aim to ensure a minimum level of care for food animals. Producer participation comes in two forms: 1) voluntary or 2) because it is required by a component of the supply chain (either a purchaser or a retailer). Outcome-based measures of animal welfare are typically included in the cattle-focused programs. This non-regulatory approach to animal welfare has a number of benefits in terms of widespread and rapid improvements and the ability to update programs on a regular basis. The challenges include 1) the scale of assessment in terms of both number of operations to visit and with what frequency, 2) determining key welfare criteria to include in terms of validity and feasibility 3) ensuring consistency among auditors, and 4) the emergence of competing assurance programs within a sector. These challenges and benefits will be addressed with specific examples.