Companion Animal Sessions

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Current Therapy for Canine Chronic Bronchitis and Bronchomalacia

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room
Chronic bronchitis (CB) is the most common chronic respiratory impairment in dogs. It is characterized by a well-defined cascade of clinical and histologic changes in the airways. The early changes are typically stimulated by an inciting event, and include increases in airway mucus production, impairment of mucociliary clearance, and alterations in the local immune response. If left untreated, chronic bronchitis results in a cycle of chronic inflammation, chronic cough, copious mucoid airway secretions, a loss of airway integrity, and decreased mucociliary clearance. This session will focus on the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of the patient with chronic bronchitis.

Feline Chronic Nasal Disease: A Structural and Functional Approach to Therapy

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room
Idiopathic chronic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic nasal disorders in cats. It is a diagnosis made by exclusion of other disorders, and usually requires chronic management. A therapeutic approach to chronic nasal disease based on feline nasal structure and function will be outlined, with a focus on management options for idiopathic chronic rhinitis that can be done without referral.

Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Tuscany Room
CIRD, or “kennel cough,” is a complex, highly contagious respiratory infection that is spread primarily through aerosolized respiratory secretions. The interactions between the canine immune system and the classical and emerging respiratory pathogens underlying this disease complex are crucial to disease pathogenesis, and form the basis for current strategies designed to prevent infection and disease.

Antimicrobial Stewardship in Companion Animals: Welcome to a whole new era.

John Prescott

About the Speaker

John Prescott, VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

John F. Prescott is a retired veterinary bacteriologist and University Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph. He is probably best known for work on Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals and for promoting better use of antimicrobial drug use in animals. He is an editor and an author of the textbook “Antimicrobial Therapy in Veterinary Medicine”, now in its fifth edition. He was elected a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2008. He is currently Co-Chair of the Ad-Hoc Committee for Antimicrobial Stewardship in Canadian Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.

VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

Sep 9/17 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Tuscany Room
Untreatable bacterial infections (the ”post-antibiotic era”) are far more likely to emerge in companion animals than in food animals, and have already arrived in the form of the multi-drug resistant (MDR) “ESKAPE” pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius,….. etc). It’s unlikely that we can get the resistance genie back in the bottle but the stewardship approach to antibiotics will buy time until we have new antibiotics and new approaches to controlling bacterial infections. Antibiotic stewardship is a multistep approach of different sizes involving continuous improvement in how we use antibiotics, taking a “5R” focus on responsibility, reduction, replacement, refinement and review. This talk discusses the many steps that veterinarians can use to promote stewardship in companion animal practice. Some excellent practical resources in this area will be presented and discussed.

Practical Analgesia and Anesthesia in Exotic Pets, Part I

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will focus on clinically relevant anatomy and physiology related to anesthesia in birds, small mammals and reptiles. We will then discuss preparation, monitoring, and specific anesthesia protocols for each group.

Practical Analgesia and Anesthesia in Exotic Pets, Part II

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuscany Room

Common Emergencies of Exotic Pets, Part I

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will discuss the presentation, pathophysiology and treatment of common emergencies seen in exotic pets. A helpful list of differential diagnoses for common problems will be presented.

Common Emergencies of Exotic Pets, Part II

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17 5:00 pm - 5:50 pm
Tuscany Room

“Ears looking at you” Diagnosis and Management of Canine Otitis Externa

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room
Otitis externa (OE) is inflammation of the external ear canal; a common condition in small animals. OE is due to primary, predisposing and perpetuating factors. Primary factors account for the underlying etiology, predisposing factors are present prior to the development of the otitis and perpetuating factors occur as a result of the inflammation and include fungal and bacterial infections. The most commonly isolated pathogens in cases of infectious canine OE are Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Malassezia pachydermatis. With it’s multifactorial nature, OE can be a frustrating disease to treat. We will review diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

"You are what you eat!" Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies in Companion Animals

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room
Food allergies (cutaneous adverse food reactions) can manifest as pruritus, recurrent secondary infections, alopecia, erythema and up to 32% of patients will present with concurrent gastrointestinal signs. The majority of animals developing cutaneous adverse food reactions have been on a diet containing the offending allergen for years. This can make diagnosis difficult. To date, there is a lack of correlation between clinical food allergy and laboratory tests for food allergies. Confirmation of food allergy can only be determined by a novel protein/ hydrolyzed restriction diet trial. We will review clinical signs and management of food allergies in companion animals.

“I’ve tried X, Y and Z…Why is nothing working?” Common Reasons for Dermatologic Treatment Failure

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Tuscany Room
Frustration can arise when treatment instituted for a particular dermatologic disease fails to lead to clinical improvement. Other cases may initially improve, but then show a decline in their condition. Secondary infections, development of another disease or adverse drug reactions can all lead to presumed treatment failure. In these cases of “treatment failure”, diagnostic steps should always be revisited, however, further diagnostics are also likely needed.

Local Anesthetics and Local Anesthetic Techniques

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Tuscany Room
While most clinicians recognize that local and regional anesthetic techniques are useful, not everyone is comfortable using them. This session is designed to provide an overview of local anesthetics and their common use in local and regional blocks, to improve clinician comfort in using them. A very brief pain physiology review and reminder of pain treatment strategies is included. The pharmacology of local anesthetics is covered, and several local anesthetic techniques are described. Some case examples are used throughout the session, and audience participation is encouraged.

Pain Physiology and Recognition

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Tuscany Room
Recognition of pain can be very challenging in animals. This session provides a brief reminder of the importance of pain management, as well as a detailed review of pain physiology and sensitization. The rationale for providing pre emptive analgesia when possible is covered. Principles of pain recognition in animals and pain scales in several species are discussed in detail.

CRIs During Anesthesia

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
Tuscany Room
Constant rate infusions (CRIs) can improve the quality of anesthesia for many of our patients, in terms of both physiologic parameters and analgesia. This session is designed to improve clinician comfort with using CRIs during anesthesia. The rationale for including CRIs is discussed, as well as a brief review of pain management strategies. The pharmacology of drugs that are commonly used as CRIs during anesthesia is covered. Several methods to include CRIs are described. Some case examples are included, and audience participation is encouraged.